Maryland Gun Lawyer

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Maryland laws are strict when it comes to guns and firearms, that is why a Maryland gun lawyer can protect your rights and freedom if you’ve been charged. Attorney Randolph Rice is a Maryland firearm defense lawyer. That includes defending clients charged with the possession, transfer, disarming, wearing, carrying and transporting firearms and guns in Maryland.

Maryland Gun Laws

Title 4 of the Maryland criminal law provides the bulk of the gun offenses in Maryland. In addition, Maryland Public Safety Title 5 also addresses criminal penalties for regulated firearms, rifle and shotgun possession, handgun permits, and handgun rosters.

Why Hire a Maryland Gun Lawyer for Your Case

If found in possession or transporting a firearm and charged with a crime, hiring a Maryland gun lawyer may be the smartest move you make. Depending on the type of charge, there may be a mandatory jail term. The Maryland gun lawyer Randolph Rice has helped hundreds of individuals in Maryland that were facing gun charges. Let his experience go to work for you and protect your rights after a firearm charge in Maryland.

Gun and Firearm Rights in Maryland

Even though the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects the right for citizens to own firearms, States have the ability to place restrictions on possessing those devices. In Maryland, there are various categories of firearms or guns, which include:

  • Dangerous weapons;
  • Deadly weapons;
  • Firearms;
  • Bulletproof body armor;
  • Weapons;
  • Handgun;
  • Rifle;
  • Short-barreled rifle;
  • Shot-barreled shotgun;
  • Shotgun;
  • Antique firearms;;
  • Pistols;
  • Assault pistols;
  • Machine guns;
  • Destructive devices;
  • All other forms of weapons.

Each one of these devices has a specific definition and certain prohibitions from either owning, possession, transporting, wearing or carrying.

Handgun Crimes in Maryland

As an experience Maryland gun lawyer, Randolph Rice has seen numerous clients charged with handgun crimes in Maryland. Some of the most common offenses are: Wearing, carrying, or transporting a handgun, use of an handgun on the commission of a crime and restrictions on the sale, rental or transfer of a regulated firearm.

What is a Regulated Firearm in Maryland?

Maryland regulated firearms are handguns or any firearm that is any of the following specific assault weapons or their copies, regardless of which company produced and manufactured that assault weapon:

  • American Arms Spectre da Semiautomatic carbine;
  • AK–47 in all forms;
  • Algimec AGM–1 type semi–auto;
  • AR 100 type semi–auto;
  • AR 180 type semi–auto;
  • Argentine L.S.R. semi–auto;
  • Australian Automatic Arms SAR type semi–auto;
  • Auto–Ordnance Thompson M1 and 1927 semi–automatics;
  • Barrett light .50 cal. semi–auto;
  • Beretta AR70 type semi–auto;
  • Bushmaster semi–auto rifle;
  • Calico models M–100 and M–900;
  • CIS SR 88 type semi–auto;
  • Claridge HI TEC C–9 carbines;
  • Colt AR–15, CAR–15, and all imitations except Colt AR–15 Sporter H–BAR rifle;
  • Daewoo MAX 1 and MAX 2, aka AR 100, 110C, K–1, and K–2;
  • Dragunov Chinese made semi–auto;
  • Famas semi–auto (.223 caliber);
  • Feather AT–9 semi–auto;
  • FN LAR and FN FAL assault rifle;
  • FNC semi–auto type carbine;
  • F.I.E./Franchi LAW 12 and SPAS 12 assault shotgun;
  • Steyr–AUG–SA semi–auto;
  • Galil models AR and ARM semi–auto;
  • Heckler and Koch HK–91 A3, HK–93 A2, HK–94 A2 and A3;
  • Holmes model 88 shotgun;
  • Avtomat Kalashnikov semiautomatic rifle in any format;
  • Manchester Arms “Commando” MK–45, MK–9;
  • Mandell TAC–1 semi–auto carbine;
  • Mossberg model 500 Bullpup assault shotgun;
  • Sterling Mark 6;
  • P.A.W.S. carbine; Ruger mini–14 folding stock model (.223 caliber); SIG 550/551 assault rifle (.223 caliber); SKS with detachable magazine; AP–74 Commando type semi–auto; Springfield Armory BM–59, SAR–48, G3, SAR–3, M–21 sniper rifle, M1A, excluding the M1 Garand; Street sweeper assault type shotgun; Striker 12 assault shotgun in all formats; Unique F11 semi–auto type; Daewoo USAS 12 semi–auto shotgun; UZI 9mm carbine or rifle; Valmet M–76 and M–78 semi–auto; Weaver Arms “Nighthawk” semi–auto carbine; or Wilkinson Arms 9mm semi–auto “Terry”.

Who is Prohibited From Possessing a Regulated Firearm in Maryland?

Who is prohibited from possessing a regulated firearm in Maryland? A person may not possess a regulated firearm if the person:

  1. has been convicted of a disqualifying crime;
  2. has been convicted of a violation classified as a common law crime and received a term of imprisonment of more than 2 years;
  3. is a fugitive from justice;
  4. is a habitual drunkard;
  5. is addicted to a controlled dangerous substance or is a habitual user;
  6. suffers from a mental disorder as defined in § 10–101(f)(2) of the Health – General Article and has a history of violent behavior against the person or another;
  7. has been found incompetent to stand trial under § 3–106 of the Criminal Procedure Article;
  8. has been found not criminally responsible under § 3–110 of the Criminal Procedure Article;
  9. has been voluntarily admitted for more than 30 consecutive days to a facility as defined in § 10–101 of the Health – General Article;
  10. has been involuntarily committed to a facility as defined in § 10–101 of the Health – General Article;
  11. is under the protection of a guardian appointed by a court under § 13–201(c) or § 13–705 of the Estates and Trusts Article, except for cases in which the appointment of a guardian is solely a result of a physical disability;
  12. except as provided in subsection (e) of this section, is a respondent against whom:
    1. a current non ex parte civil protective order has been entered under § 4–506 of the Family Law Article; or
    2. an order for protection, has been issued by a court of another state or a Native American tribe and is in effect; or
  13. if under the age of 30 years at the time of possession, has been adjudicated delinquent by a juvenile court for an act that would be a disqualifying crime if committed by an adult.
  14. previously convicted of:
    1. a crime of violence;
    2. a violation of § 5–602, § 5–603, § 5–604, § 5–605, § 5–612, § 5–613, or § 5–614 of the Criminal Law Article; or
    3. an offense under the laws of another state or the United States that would constitute one of the crimes listed in item (i) or (ii) of this paragraph if committed in this State.

 
 

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